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Plants in the Daisy Family
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Plants in the Daisy Family

Daisy 1 image by David MacFarlane from Fotolia.comThe daisy family, known botanically as Asteraceae or formerly as Compositae, is the second largest plant family in the world after the orchid family. While many plants in the daisy family are easy to recognize, with their disc centers and ring of petals, some lack petals entirely or have so many petals as to hide the disc.

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Ducks: Pomeranian

Origin, spread and economic characteristics Heavy breed originating in Germany, not widespread. It lays around 100-160 eggs per year with a white to greenish shell. Raised for the production of meat and eggs Morphological characteristics Dark plumage with white neck and breast Orange spout and legs.
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Ducks: Emerald or Black East Indian

Origin, diffusion and economic characteristics The ducks with the black color are divided into two types, the heavy Cayuga type and the lighter Emerald Duck. Both have a bright black plumage, which tends to green. The origin, however, is not common, in fact they differ in weight and shape. The origin of the two ducks is mysterious and we do not know which of the two has been selected before, nor where they come from, nor whether they were created by man or discovered in nature.
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Ducks: Swedish Yellow

Origin, spread and economic characteristics The Swedish Yellow (Svensk gul anka) is an old Swedish breed with a typical ocher yellow plumage. Very rare also in its homeland of origin. Morphological characteristics Ocher yellow plumage. Swedish duck. Swedish duck
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Ducks: Welsh Harlequin - Harlequin of Wales

Origin, spread and economic characteristics Like all breeds of ducks created in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, the Harlequin Ducks of Wales or Welsh Harlequin also carry the genetic makeup of the Indian Corritories. This has ensured over the years an exceptional vitality and resistance deriving from heterosis, also this genetic makeup has transformed them into an excellent laying duck.
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Ducks: Swedish

Origin, distribution and economic characteristics Heavy breed originating in Sweden. It comes from Pomeranian ducks. Morphological characteristics There are some varieties: black white breast, blue white breast, chocolate white breast, splash. Much rarer is the Swedish yellow breed with fawn plumage.
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Ducks: Shelduck

Distribution and habitat This duck owes its characteristic name to the habit of occupying the lairs of foxes and badgers. It is widespread along the coasts of northern Europe (especially the North Sea and the Baltic), in Asia (China, Japan and the lakes of Siberia). in Italy it is sedentary in Sardinia.
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Ducks: American-type Beijing

Origin, diffusion and economic characteristics There are currently two varieties: American and German. The selection of the latter is purely German and English and has led to the formation of a more upright type with yellowish white plumage. American Peking has pure white plumage.
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Beekeeping: Other products

Alcohol or hydromel Alcoholic drink obtained by diluting honey with water and subsequent fermentation. The dilution of the water causes the proliferation of the yeasts contained in the honey (with a humidity lower than 20 the yeasts remain inactive) which obtain energy from the consumption of sugars by using oxygen and freeing CO2 and water.
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Bees - Beekeeping online ">Bees - Beekeeping online

Apiculture Atlas This section is dedicated to the breeding of bees in order to exploit the products of the hive. Dr. Alessandra Bruni, graduated in Agricultural Science and Technology at the Faculty of Agriculture of Florence, collaborated in its creation. Apiculture Atlas. the systematic classification of bees, their morphology and physiology, the development cycle, social organization and pollination; in Apiculture, the history, equipment, flora and beekeeping operations; finally in Bee Products the main characteristics of: honey, royal jelly, propolis, pollen, wax, poison and other products are illustrated.
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Beekeeping: Wax

While the other insects create the nest with the materials found in the environment, the bees produce the construction material by themselves: wax. It is a fatty substance, entirely of animal origin, secreted by the silky glands functioning in workers aged between 10 and 16 days; to produce 1 kg of wax, 9 to 12 kg of honey are needed and the greatest production occurs during the spring period.
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Beekeeping: Breeding equipment

The hive is the artificial shelter where bees live and can be a container of various shapes and sizes, built with the most varied materials and inside which bees build honeycombs, raise the brood and deposit honey. rustic (rustic bugs) are fixed honeycombs and are used by man from the dawn of beekeeping to the present day, making use of hollow tree trunks, wicker baskets, straw bells, cork containers where bees build their honeycombs in their own way.
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Beekeeping: Systematic classification

Order: HymenopteraFamily: ApidaeGender: ApisSpecies: mellifera Breed: ligusticaThe honey bee (Apis Mellifera L.) is a hymenoptera belonging to the family of apids, it is native to Africa and through France has spread throughout Europe. The A..mellifera is the most bred species but three other species belong to the Apis genus: The most bred breed in Italy and mostly widespread throughout the world is the ligustica, although there are others that are divided into three groups : · European breeds · Oriental breeds · African breeds Within the various breeds there are also subraces and strains with different characteristics compared to other groups of the same breed, for example the American bee is a particular strain of Apis mellifera ligustica.
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Beekeeping: Insertion of a new queen

To introduce a new queen into a family, precautions must be taken.If we raised the queen on our own, we need to mark it on the chest with the color of the year to capture it and put it in a cage for queens, while if we buy the queen from a specialized breeder it will be already in the cage.
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Beekeeping: Development Cycle

The stages of development preceding adulthood are labeled with the term brood and are distinguished in egg, larva and pupa. Table 1 - Phases of development Stadium Time spent in days Stadium duration in days Uncapped brood Eggs 0 to 33 young larva arcuatada 3 to 63larva with the extremities that touch each other from 6 to 93 Operated hatch elongated under the operacol from 9 to 134 pupa with non-pigmented eyes 13 to 174 pupa with pigmented eyes 17 to 214 Total 21 Source: Contessi, A.
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Beekeeping: Pollination

The morphology of the bee is closely linked to pollination: the insect is covered with hairs which, during visits to the flowers, are completely filled with pollen grains thus transporting the male gametes to the pistils and ensuring the reproduction of life and biodiversity. Pollination by pollinators is an indispensable factor for many crops.
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Ducks: Streicher

Origin, spread and economic characteristics This duck was selected in England (Abacot-Essex) around 1920 by Oscar Gray, crossing a female Campbell with a white male of the Indian corrector. Initially the subjects obtained did not have a well defined coloration but were mostly white.
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Beekeeping: Beekeeping flora and honey potential

Due to its particular geographical configuration, Italy has a considerable variety of honey species: starting from the north with arctic-apline species up to the south with tropical species, while the proximity of the sea to the mountain ranges determines an overlapping of species of climatic horizons different.
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Beekeeping: Morphology and physiology

The body of the adult worker bee is covered with a protective layer, provided with bristles and hairs and is made up of three parts, the head, the thorax and the abdomen. The head and thorax are distinctly distinct from the abdomen. The head, or head of the worker bee, has a triangular shape, where at the upper corners are the compound eyes, two, of large size.
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Beekeeping: Honey

Honey derives from a transformation of the nectar through the addition of enzymes. The nectar arrives in the melaria bag, a dilation of the esophagus where it is accumulated, after which the foragers return to the hive regurgitate the content to the house bees that provide to add other enzymes. (through the phenomenon of trophylaxis).
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Beekeeping: Artificial Nutrition

As winter approaches, one of the beekeeper's precautions is to check the supplies and sometimes it is necessary to intervene with a rescue feeding, but there are other occasions: bad weather conditions that prevent bees from foraging, adverse weather season which involves a lack of nectar, the formation of new nuclei that need food for the formation of new honeycombs and the breeding of broods, the breeding of queens, colonies used in the pollination service of non-nectar species (e.g.
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